This Fan Theory Claims That 'Game Of Thrones' Happens On Post-Global Warming Earth

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Hello and welcome to yet another fan theory about the hit HBO series Game Of Thrones. Get comfortable, because this is quite a long one. 

Since the hit drama hit our screens in 2011, the internet hasn’t been short of complex fan theories and predictions of what would come next. Despite (some of) the books being published and easily available to read, many viewers still found themselves surprised by the twists and turns of the show’s plot.

It’s set to return to our screens in just a few months now, so it makes sense that another new fan theory has cropped up to get us all thinking before we see Westeros again.

As reported by MoviePilot, one fan recently asked GOT author George RR Martin:

“Basically, if you were to sit down with a Maester and ask him what planet he lives on, he would have an answer, right?”

And Martin responded:

“He would probably call it Earth.

Of course, it would not be that word, since he’d be speaking the Common Tongue, not English.

But it would mean Earth.”

And so a new theory was born. If GOT does in fact take place on Earth, it obviously happens either far, far before our time or far after. The theory deepens when you take into account the unpredictable seasons experienced in the story. In our time, seasons last a certain amount of time and relate to where the earth is in comparison to the sun.

A passage from The World of Ice and Fire suggests that our regular seasons are regarded as a thing of legend or a myth to those in the GOT world – which would suggest they are far, far in our future.

“Though the Citadel has long sought to learn the manner by which it may predict the length and change of seasons, all efforts have been confounded. Septon Barth appeared to argue, in a fragmentary treatise, that the inconstancy of the seasons was a matter of magical art rather than trustworthy knowledge.

Maester Nicol’s The Measure of the Days — otherwise a laudable work containing much of use — seems influenced by this argument. Based upon his work on the movement of stars in the firmament, Nicol argues unconvincingly that the seasons might once have been of a regular length, determined solely by the way in which the globe faces the sun in its heavenly course.

The notion behind it seems true enough — that the lengthening and shortening of days, if more regular, would have led to more regular seasons — but he could find no evidence that such was ever the case, beyond the most ancient of tales.”

But what could possible throw the earth so off kilter? Climate change.

Are you still following?

A slightly separate but related theory claims that GOT itself is actually about climate change. In 2015 Christopher Haubursin and Zack Beauchamp over at Vox linked GOT with climate change, saying that the white walkers themselves are a metaphor for global warming and the noble houses represent the world leaders.

“Yet instead of uniting to combat the shared threat to human existence itself, the noble houses in the show spend basically all their time on their own petty disagreements and struggle for power. White Walkers are generally ignored; some nobles deny their existence outright…”

Wow, deep.

Admittedly, I’m not entirely convinced – but then again I’m the kind of viewer who just likes to watch shows and take them for face value. Sorry, internet.

What do you think? Let us know in the comments!

Images via HBO

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